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ITC Air Systems

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***NOTE: THIS GUIDE IS OUTDATED AS OF SEPTEMBER 2018 (version 1.8), THE NEW DOCUMENTATION CAN BE FOUND HERE***

Introduction

ITC Air Systems is a mod for ArmA 3 that seeks to implement modern and realistic avionics and weapons onto aircraft in Arma 3. Currently the base mod applies to variants of vanilla ArmA 3 aircraft. with a focus on air-to-ground operations

Aircraft

The following aircraft are currently modified by the ITC Air Systems mod, and all feature similar avionics and weapons, with small variations between them. Note that these aircraft do not overwrite the vanilla aircraft they are based off of, so ensure you select the correct aircraft in the 3D editor (class names will start with "itc_")

From back to front: A-10E, A-159, JAS-39E, F-181E

A-10E

A version of the A-164 "Wipeout" from ArmA 3, the aircraft is a dedicated close air support aircraft. In addition to a large amount of smart weapon stations, the A-10E has a 30mm gatling cannon loaded with a 4:1 mix of armor-piercing to high-explosive rounds. With no radar and limited air-to-air ordinance, the A-10E is vulnerable to enemy fighters.

A-159

A small and light multi-role aircraft, the A-159 carries a fairly light amount of ordinance, but is highly adaptable to a particular mission. It is very nimble and maneuverable, but not as fast as some larger aircraft. It can carry most ordinance, but does not have any smart weapon stations, so keep in mind any laser codes must be set externally before take-off. It is analogous to the Czech L-159 Alca trainer/light-attack jet.

F-181E

A multi-role naval fighter, capable from operating from land or carriers. The F-181E can carry a varied payload for air-to-air or air-to-ground targets. Fast, but not as maneuverable as the other planes, the F-181E is best attacking targets from higher altitudes and standoff distances. Can carry smart, guided, and unguided bombs, air-to-air missiles, air-to-ground missiles. Not equipped with rockets. There is also a stealth variant without external pylons. Analogous to the U.S. Navy F-18E Super Hornet.

JAS-39E

A multi-role fighter, the JAS-39E carries a similar range of ordinance to the F-181E, albeit a lighter amount, and has stations for rocket pods. Like the F-181E, the JAS-39's high speed means it is more suited to stand-off air support rather than lower-altitude operations. Analogous to the Swedish JAS-39 Gripen.

Controls Setup

ITC features several new controls not included in the default game. A new user should take the time to familiarize themselves with these controls and rebind them to their preference and to avoid conflicts with other addons.

Throughout this guide, the controls will be referred to by their "Action" label, rather than default key-bind, to account for different controllers and setups.

These can be accessed by going to Options>Controls>Configure Addons and selecting the ITC-related sections from the drop down menu.

Binding keys to Joystick or Controller

Due to the way CBA keybinds work, some controllers may require you the use ArmA's "Custom Controls" to first bind the controller buttons to a "Use Action", then dragging the corresponding "Use Action" from the right side of the keybind menu into the keybind box of the desired ITC control.

Itc control1.jpg
Itc control2.jpg
Another option includes using a keyboard emulator for your joystick to assign joystick buttons to the keyboard binds of ITC controls. The Steam Controller also has options to bind its buttons and pads to keyboard inputs, using steam's big picture mode.

Controls Cheat Sheet

Cheat sheet showing the various functions of the controls depending on the sensor selected.

Pre-Flight

MicroDAGR Integration

The ACE mod's MicroDAGR can be used to create waypoints, once in the aircraft the pilot can load the DAGR waypoints into the STPT page. The steerpoints will be loaded with the same names used in the MicroDAGR.

An example of a waypoint from the MicroDAGR loaded into the aircraft's steerpoints.

Munitions

APKWS

Before flight, APKWS rockets must have their laser code set by interacting with the aircraft via the ACE interact menu. This can not be done from the cockpit, regardless if the rocket pod is attached to a smart station or not.

ACE Interact > Set APKWS seeker code > code

GBU-12

Before flight, the GBU-12 must have their laser code set by interacting with the aircraft via the ACE interact menu. This can not be done from the cockpit, regardless if the bomb is attached to a smart station or not.

ACE Interact > Set Paveways seeker code > code

Itc gbu code.jpg

Sensors/MFD Pages

Multi-Function Displays, or MFDs, are how the pilot views and interacts with the various sensors and weapons on the aircraft. Two MFDs, left and right, each have an array of 5 buttons on each side of the display. They correspond to options and inputs on the MFD screen. In addition, numerical values can be input into certain options by using the cursor and Up-Front Controller (UFC).

UFC

The Up-Front Controller, or UFC, is not displayed on the MFDs, but can be accessed by pressing the MFD Cursor button. This will bring up a numpad-like dialog that can enter numerical values by pressing the buttons with the cursor. Pressing the "ENT" button will enter the value into the selected MFD option, allowing the pilot to enter numbers such as laser-codes and grids. To remove the UFC and cursor, simply press Esc.

Itc ufc.jpg

TGP

The TGP page allows you to access your aircraft's targeting pod. The TGP is a powerful tool that assists the pilot in locating and engaging targets, and observing the ground below them.

Itc tgp.png

Controls When SOI

  • SOI Up/Down/Left/Right - Slews the TGP.
  • TMS
    • Forward - Lrack target TGP is oriented on.ock the TGP onto a target.
    • Forward Long - Cues all sensors to TGP.
    • Aft - Cycles through vision modes
    • Aft Long - Cues all sensors to current steerpoint.
    • Left - Creates a markpoint from TGP's location.
    • Right - Toggles the targeting laser on and off.
  • DMS
    • Up - Zoom TGP in
    • Down - Zoom TGP out
    • Left - Cycle slew rate

MFD Options

  • L1 - Toggles the laser-seeking mode, the TGP will search for and lock onto a laser matching the laser-code entered in the TGP.
  • L2 - Displays the laser code to be searched while in LSS mode. Can be changed by pressing the button, then entering a new 4-digit laser code using the UFC.
  • L3 - Activates the dargetingargetingesignating laser using the code entered in the TGP.
  • L4 - Displays the laser code to be used by targeting laser. Can be chanced by pressing the button, then entering a new 4-digit laser code using the UFC.
  • L5 - Cycles between slew rates (slow to fast).
  • R1 - Activates the IR marking laser visible in night-vision, useful for orienting friendly forces on the current location the TGP is locked to. Does not target laser-guided munitions.
  • R2 - Changes the pulse-rate of the marking laser, useful for differentiating the laser from other friendly aircraft, or signaling friendlies.
  • R3 - FOV +, increases the magnification of TGP
  • R4 - FOV -. decreases the magnification of TGP
  • R5 - Cycles between camera modes, DTV (color), NV (Night-Vision), FLIR (Thermal White-Hot)
  • T3 - Locks the TGP forward towards the nose of the aircraft.

Note: The TGP can also be slewed in full screen as in vanilla ArmA 3 via the targeting pod key-bind (default Ctrl + Right Click) and ground lock key-bind (default Ctrl + T), although MFD-specific actions will still need to be done through the MFD.

TAD

The TAD page opens the Tactical Awareness Display, which can aid in navigation and situational awareness.

Itc tad.jpg

Controls When SOI

  • SOI Up/Down/Left/Right - Scrolls the cursor around the TAD map.
  • TMS
    • Forward - Hook
    • Forward Long - Cue all sensors to cursor's location.
    • Aft - Cycle through TAD modes.
    • Aft Long - Cue all sensors to current steerpoint.
    • Left - Create markpoint at current cursor location.
  • DMS
    • Forward - Zoom TAD in.
    • Aft - Zoom TAD out.

MFD Options

  • ADJ +/- - Located in the top left of the MFD, adjusts the level of zoom of the map on the TAD, and thereby reduces the rate the cursor scrolls across the map. Used when more detail or finer control of cursor is desired.
  • L2 - Turns the map overlay on and off.
  • L3 - Cycles through Hook modes.
  • L4 - Creates markpoint at cursor location.

DSMS

  • The DSMS page displays the Digital Stores Management System, which allows the pilot to view, select, and interact with the ordinance and weapons carried by their aircraft.
    • The STAT (default) screen displays the name and amount of all current stores. The selected weapon is indicated in green, and relevant information about that weapon is displayed in the middle of the screen.
Itc dsms stat.jpg
    • The PROF screen displays all current weapon profiles.
Itc dsms prof main.jpg
    • The VIEW PROF page shows the options for the selected profile. Specific options for weapons are covered in the munitions section.
An example profile page for the GBU-54v4
    • The INV page allows you to modify where each weapon is displayed on the DSMS.

STAT

  • The STAT page allows for a display of the status of the various systems of the aircraft, as well as specific information.
    • The NAV (default) page displays relevant information to the navigation and flight time of the aircraft.
    • The DAM page displays any damaged systems to the aircraft (in basic ArmA-terms) can be used to determine if there is fuel leak, engine damage, etc.
    • The SYS page displays currently active avionics, and can be used to restart specific systems (to fix possible bugs).

STPT

The STPT page displays information regarding the steerpoints currently used by the aircraft.

Itc stpt.jpg
MFD Options

L1 / L2 - Scrolls up and down the steerpoint list.

L3 - N/A

L4 - Deletes the selected steerpoint.

L5 - Creates a new steerpoint for manual entry.

R1 - Once pressed, the MGRS grid of the selected steerpoint can be changed by entering it into the UFC.

R2 - Once pressed, the elevation/altitude in meters of the selected steerpoint can be changed by entering it into the UFC.

Each steerpoint is listed by name (default Mark 1, Mark 2, etc....), with the currently selected steerpoint highlighted in green.

OPT

The OPT page displays miscellaneous options available for configuration not typically crucial to the pilot. It is also where the rover frequency can be set when ground forces wish to connect to the aircraft's targeting pod via a rover receiver.

MAV

  • The MAV page is specific to the AGM-65 Maverick-series of air-to-ground missiles. Currently, it is split into two sub-pages. Note these pages will only open if the applicable missile is selected first.
    • The LMAV screen opens the targeting display for the laser-guided AGM-65E missile.
    • The LMAV targeting screen, note the solid green square indicating the seeker has a lock.
      The LMAV targeting screen searching for a laser code of 1111
    • The MAV screen displays the camera on the seeker of the optically-guided AGM-65H missile.
      The optical maverick MFD. Note the range indicator on the left, and the small crosshair just below the targeting crosshair, indicating the aircraft's flight path in relation to the target.

Control When SOI (Optical Maverick Only)

  • SOI Up/Down/Left/Right - Slews the maverick seeker around once ground-stabilized.
  • TMS
    • Forward - Locks the maverick seeker to a target.
    • Forward Long - Cues all sensors to the maverick's camera.
    • Aft - Ground Stabilizes the maverick's camera.
    • Aft Long - Cues all sensors to the selected steerpoint.
    • Left - Creates a steerpoint from the maverick's camera.
  • DMS
    • Forward - Sets camera to Narrow FOV.
    • Aft - Sets camera to Wide FOV.
    • Left - Cycles between camera slew rates (slow to fast).

MFD Controls

  • MAV
    • R1 - Sets maverick seeker to narrow field-of-vision (high magnification)
    • R2 - Sets the maverick seeker to wide field-of-vision (low magnification)
    • R3 - Cycles the slew-rate of the maverick seeker between fast (5), medium (3), and slow (1)
  • LMAV
    • L1 - Clicking this button will allow the pilot to enter the laser code the seeker will search for using the UFC.

FCR

The FCR page displays information from the aircraft's fire control radar. The FCR allows the pilot to scan for targets on the ground, and can assist in targeting from stand off distances.

Munitions

Bombs

Unguided Bombs

Itc jdam.png

ITC improves functionality for several of the vanilla ArmA 3 unguided bombs, including the Mk-82 500lb general purpose bomb, CBU-87, CBU-100, and BLU-778 cluster bombs.

Profile Options:

Fuzes (Mk-82):

  • Point Detonating (Nose Fuze)
  • Delay (Tail Fuze)

Quantity/Ripple:

  • Single
  • Pairs
  • Ripple Single
  • Ripple Pairs
  • Ripple Quantity
    • The number of bombs or pairs of bombs to be released each press of the fire button
  • Ripple Distance (meters)
    • The distance in meters between drops during ripple.

Use (CCIP):

  1. Select the bomb in the DSMS or by cycling to it by pressing F.
  2. Ensure the desired fusing, and release quantity is set in the weapon's profile.
  3. Ensure that CCIP mode is selected in the weapon's profile.
  4. Maneuver your aircraft until the CCIP reticle on your HUD is centered on your target.
  5. Release the bomb once reticle is over target.

Use (CCRP):

Note: CCRP mode requires that a waypoint be placed on the desired impact point.

  1. Selet the bomb in the DSMS or by cylcing to it by pressing F.
  2. Ensure the desired fuzing, and release quantity are set in the weapon's profile.
  3. Ensure that CCRP mode is selected in the weapon's profile.
  4. Select the waypoint that corresponds with the target from the STPT page or by cycling to it.
  5. Your HUD will display two vertical lines.
    1. The target is represented by the line with a static circle in the upper portion.
    2. Your aircraft is represented by the line with a circle that moves.
  6. Maneuver the aircraft until the aircraft's indicator is aligned to the target's indicator. Keep the two lines aligned as you approach the target.
  7. The aircraft's indicator should have a circle that is moving slowly upward towards the static circle of the target's indicator. This is the range to the release point.
  8. Release the bomb(s) once the aircraft and target's circle overlap, ensuring the two vertical lines remain aligned.

GBU-12 Paveway II Laser-Guided Bomb

Itc gbu.png

The GBU-12 is a 500 lbs (227kg) laser-guided bomb. Similar effects to the Mk-82, but with a laser seeker that directs the bomb towards a laser spot, allowing for an extremely high degree of accuracy. It continues to seek towards the laser spot once released, allowing it to engage moving targets or switch targets mid-flight provided it is able to maneuver.

Profile Options: Fuzes/Guidance:

  • Point Detonating (Tail Fuze)
  • LS Mode On/Off (Automatically turns on the TGP targeting laser once bomb is released)
    • Note: The laser will not automatically turn off after impact. Additionally, ensure the TGP is set to the same laser code as the weapon.

Quantity/Ripple:

  • Single
  • Pairs
  • Ripple Single
  • Ripple Pairs
  • Ripple Quantity
    • The number of bombs or pairs of bombs to be released each press of the fire button
  • Ripple Distance (meters)
    • The distance in meters between drops during ripple.

Use:

  1. Select the GBU-12 using the DSMS or by pressing F.
  2. Ensure that the target is being designated by a laser using the same code that is set on the bomb.
  3. Maneuver the aircraft towards the target, with enough altitude to allow the bomb to maneuver.
  4. Once in range, place the CCIP reticle over the target, and release the bomb.
  5. Ensure the laser remains on the target until impact. If not self-lasing, the bomb requires no further input from the pilot.

GBU-38, GBU-32, GBU-31 JDAM

Itc jdam2.png

The Joint Direct Attack Munition is family of precision GPS-guided bombs. The bomb comes in various weights (500lbs GBU-38, 1000lbs GBU-32, 2000lbs GBU-31). The JDAM's guidance is automatically programmed to guide towards the aircraft's currently selected steerpoint. Once the bomb is released, its target location can not be changed mid-flight, making it unsuitable for moving targets.

The v4 variant features a reduced blast-radius, allowing it to minimize collateral damage and be used in closer proximity to friendlies.

Fuzes/Guidance:

  • Proximity (Nose Fuze)
  • Point Detonating/Delay (Tail Fuze)
  • Impact Angle (Use UFC to enter new angle in degrees)

Quantity/Ripple:

  • Single
  • Pairs
  • Ripple Single
  • Ripple Pairs
  • Ripple Quantity
    • The number of bombs or pairs of bombs to be released each press of the fire button
  • Ripple Distance (meters)
    • The distance in meters between drops during ripple.

Use:

  1. Select the JDAM using the DSMS or by cycling to it by pressing F.
  2. Enter the grid of the target as a steerpoint, or select the target's steerpoint using the Cycle WP keys or the STPT page.
  3. Maneuver your aircraft towards the steerpoint indicator on your HUD/TAD.
  4. Once within range, and with enough altitude for the bomb to maneuver, ensure the aircraft is pointed towards the target.
  5. Release the bomb, after release the bomb requires no further input from the pilot.

GBU-39 SDB

Itc sdb.png

The GBU-39 Small Diameter Bomb is a GPS-guided glide bomb. Designed to engage targets at stand-off distance, the bomb glides towards its target, extending its range beyond that of normal bombs. As with all GPS-guided munitions, it is best used against static targets. Due to its small size and low weight (~200lbs), an aircraft can carry a larger number of bombs and reduce the chance of collateral damage.

Use:

  1. Select the GBU-39 using the DSMS or by cycling to it by pressing F.
  2. Ensure the desired fusing, impact angle, and ripple quantity are set in the weapon's DSMS profile.
  3. Ensure the steerpoint corresponding to the target is selected using the STPT page or by cycling to it.
  4. Ensure the aircraft has enough altitude and is pointed in the general direction of the target.
  5. Release the bomb, after release it requires no further input from the pilot.

GBU-54 v1/v4 LJDAM

The GBU-54 is a 500 lbs (227kg) GPS and Laser-guided bomb. Combining both the advantages of the GBU-12 and GBU-38, the GBU-54 will guide towards its target GPS location until it detects a laser spot matching it's code, it will then seek towards the laser's last seen location. If the laser spot is lost or stopped, the bomb will simply guide towards the laser's last known location.

The v4 variant features a reduced blast-radius, allowing it to minimized collateral damage and be used in closer proximity to friendlies.

Profile Options:

Fuzes/Guidance:

  • Point Detonating/Delay (Tail Fuze)
  • Impact Angle (Use UFC to enter new angle in degrees)
  • Laser Code (Use UFC to enter new code)
  • LS Mode On/Off (Automatically turns on the TGP targeting laser once bomb is released)
    • Note: The laser will not automatically turn off after impact. Additionally, ensure the TGP is set to the same laser code as the weapon's profile.

Quantity/Ripple:

  • Single
  • Pairs
  • Ripple Single
  • Ripple Pairs
  • Ripple Quantity
    • The number of bombs or pairs of bombs to be released each press of the fire button
  • Ripple Distance (meters)
    • The distance in meters between drops during ripple.


Use:

  1. Select the GBU-348 using the DSMS or by cycling to it by pressing F.
  2. In the DSMS profile, ensure the laser code being used by the designating laser matches the one in the profile.
    1. If only using the bomb's GPS guidance, ensure the target's grid is entered and selected as the steerpoint.
  3. Maneuver the aircraft towards the target/laser spot.
  4. Once in range, and with enough altitude to allow the bomb to maneuver, place the CCIP reticle near the steerpoint/laser spot.
  5. Release the bomb, if not self-lasing, the bomb requires no further input from the pilot.
    1. If the bomb loses the laser spot in-flight, it will simply target the last known GPS location the laser spot was tracked.

Air-to-Ground Missiles

AGM-65E Maverick

Itc mav.png

The AGM-65E is a laser-guided air-to-ground missile, primarily designed to engage enemy vehicles and materiel. It has a large shaped-charge warhead capable of destroying main battle tanks. The target must be continuously lased until impact in order to be effective.

Use

  1. Select the AGM-65E using the DSMS or cycling to it using F.
  2. Open the MAV page on an MFD.
  3. Select the LMAV page from the top left of the MAV page.
  4. Press the L1 button, then using the UFC, enter the code being used by designating laser.
  5. An "X" moving back and forth across the MFD indicates the maverick is searching for a laser spot.
  6. Once pointed at the target, the X should change to a solid green square.
  7. Keep the square centered in the crosshair of the MFD, and once ready and in range, fire the missile.
  8. Ensure the laser spot is maintained on target until impact.

AGM-65K, AGM-65G Maverick

Itc mav.png

The AGM-65K and AGM-65G are optically-guided air-to-ground missiles, primarily designed to engage enemy vehicles and materiel. It features a large shaped-charge warhead capable of destroying main battle tanks. These missileshe AGM-65 must be locked to a target using it's optical seeker. Once fired, it requires no further guidance from the pilot. The K-model uses a daytime black and white camera, ideal for daylight and clear conditions. The G-model uses an infrared camera, ideal for night time or adverse weather conditions, or to engage targets such as vehicles and boats that will give off a higher heat signature.

Use

  1. Select the AGM-65K or G using the DSMS or cycling to it using F.
  2. Open the MAV page on an MFD, then set that MFD as SOI.
  3. Select the MAV sub-page at the top right of the MAV page.
  4. Orient the aircraft towards the target, then ground-stabilize the seeker by pressing TMS Aft.
  5. Use the SOI Up/Down/Left/Right keys to move the seeker until centered on the target. The TGP can also be used to locate the target, then cue the maverick's camera to the TGP.
    1. The HUD will display a circular aiming symbol to assist in aiming the maverick seeker.
    2. DMS Foreward and DMS Aft Can be used to switch between wide and narrow FOV, this can also be done via the MFD buttons.
  6. Once centered, press TMS Forward to lock the seeker onto the target.
    1. The crosshair on the MFD will narrow once locked.
  7. When ready and in range, fire. The missile does not need further input from the pilot once launched.
    1. The indicator on the left side of the MFD indicates the aircraft's position within the missile's maximum (bottom) and minimum (top) ranges. The range to target is displayed in kilometers at the bottom the the indicator.

Note: If the Maverick seeker does not ground stabilize, try switching to a different page on the MFD then back to the MAV page.

AGM-158 JASSM

Itc jassm.png

The AGM-158 Joint Air to Surface Standoff Missile is a GPS-guided 1000lbs cruise missile. Intended to be used as a stand-off weapon to engage targets defended by long-range surface to air missiles or other defenses that pose a threat to friendly aircraft.

Use

  1. Select the JASSM using the DSMS or by cycling to it by pressing F.
  2. Ensure the weapon's desired impact angle is set using the DSMS profile.
  3. Select the steerpoint of the desired target.
  4. Fire the missile, after launch it requires no further input from the pilot.

Rockets

Itc apkws.png

Profile Options: Quantity/Ripple:

  • Single
  • Pairs
  • Ripple Single
  • Ripple Pairs
  • Ripple Quantity
    • Number of rockets or pairs of rockets to be fired in each ripple.

APKWS

The Advanced Precision-Kill Weapon System is a lock-on-after-launch (LOAL) seeker for 70mm rockets, allowing them greater precision. The laser code they use must be set externally before flight. They require no input from the pilot before or after firing, but must be aimed within 40 degrees of the laser spot, and within the rocket's range.

Use

  1. Ensure the laser code being used to designate matches the laser code set on the rockets before take-off.
  2. Select the APKWS from the DSMS or by cycling to it by pressing F.
  3. Maneuver the aircraft towards the laser spot.
  4. Once in range, place the HUD crosshair on or close to the laser spot, and fire.
  5. The rockets will lock-on to the laser spot after launch, and if not self-lasing require no further input from the pilot.

M156 WP Rocket

The M156 is a 70mm unguided rocket that carries a white phosphorus filler. The rocket produces a large white cloud of smoke upon impact, allowing it to be used to mark targets, or provide limited obscuration (~30 seconds).

Use:

  1. Select the M156 from the DSMS or by cycling to it by pressing F.
  2. Maneuver the aircraft towards the target, once in range, place the HUD reticle over the target.
  3. Fire the rockets.

Miscellaneous

Glossary of Terms

Term Definition
SOI Sensor of Interest, the MFD or HMCS selected as the sensor of interest.

Allows for expanded control options when set to SOI, denoted by a green outline around the MFD screen.

SPI Sensor Point of Interest. A particular point a sensor is pointed to, when set to SPI will typically slew other sensors (such as a maverick camera)

to that point.

HUD Heads-Up Display. A display mounted just in front of the pilot that provides information without having to look down at the instrument panel.
WP Waypoint. A point in space that is loaded in the aircraft's navigation system. Accessible in the STPT MFD page.
DSMS Digital Stores Management System. A page in the MFD that displays all current ordinance on the aircraft's weapon stations.

Also allows the pilot to change options and employment of the weapons, provided they are attached to smart weapon stations.

LGB Laser-Guided Bomb. A bomb that is guided by a laser-seeking sensor, and guides towards a specific laser point.
JDAM Joint Direct Attack Munition. A bomb that uses GPS guidance to guide towards a set of coordinates.
APKWS Advanced Precision Kill Weapon System. A laser-seeking 70mm rocket that guides towards a laser spot after launch.
Gound

Stabilized

A state in which a sensor is locked to a point on the ground, and will stay oriented on it regardless of how the aircraft maneuvers.
Lase Typically refers to a laser designating a target. i.e. "Lase the tank"
Slew The movement of a sensor. i.e. "Slew the TGP left"
Ripple To release multiple munitions in sequence, using a single trigger pull.
CCIP Constantly Computed Impact Point. A method of aiming munitions, wherein an aiming point constantly adjusts

to the predicted impact point on the ground. Typically displayed on the aircraft's HUD, represented by a circular outline with a dot in the middle. Usually used when an aircraft dives towards a target before releasing a bomb.

CCRP Constantly Computed Release Point. A method of aiming munitions, wherein an impact point is pre-set, and the release point for that target is displayed

on the aircraft's HUD. Usually used when the aircraft remains in level flight, as the pilot does not need to enter a dive to aim the munition.

TGP Targeting Pod. A gyro-stabilized camera carried by the aircraft that can assist the pilot in targeting.
Laser

Code

The 4-digit code used to differentiate targeting lasers.

A laser-guided munition typically must be set to seek a specific code, and the designating laser must use that code.

LOAL Lock-On-After-Launch. A method of guidance in which a munition's seeker will lock on to a target after launching from the aircraft,

typically used by laser-guided munitions such as the APKWS. Allows the pilot to launch without necessarily needing to see the laser spot.

HMCS Head-Mounted Cueing System, a helmet-mounted display independent of the aircaft's HUD that can display information and assist the pilot in visually controlling their sensors.

Can be set to SOI to provide additional capabilities.